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Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Fri Mar 18, 2016 11:41 pm

Hello to everyone on the board. I caught wind of this board through a comment on a video I made from the sites Admin. I'd like to thank him for telling me about it. I haven't been a member of any type of forum for many years, though I have been known as a prominent member of several in the past. Sadly, there was never an Amiga group in that list. Looks like we're pretty small at the moment, but that's okay, gives everyone a chance to keep up with things.

Shot has been my internet name since 1997 and I came up with the name a couple years earlier at the start of the game Wing Commander. It asks you for your callsign and last name... Wanting something fresh (the previous one was gifted by my father - He was Big Daddy - I was Little Daddy) I sat at the computer typing in name after name until I wrote Shot. It's always been a variation of that since.

My dad was a big nerd, who was into photography long before computers and got a Commodore 64 in the early 80's. My uncle and him would go to various groups and "trade" games. His C64 library was so vast I'm still going through them all. I'm pretty sure a lot of people have never heard of so many of these ones. I was born in 1985 and I really only have two memories of our C64 back then... The first: Me begging my sister to let me play a game... She put up a Barbie game. I remember driving in the town (big sprites) and shopping in it. The 2nd memory, I kind of accidentally knocked it off the desk and it fell...

It was 1987 and my father used this as an excuse to get the brand new Amiga 500. It came with a Commodore monitor, the tank mouse (later upgraded), a C64 joystick (later upgraded), an extra disk drive (replaced later), and a dot-matrix printer. A couple grand at the time I'm sure. That remained our main computer until he reluctantly went PC in 1995, as Windows 95 was finally impressive enough (he was not a fan of DOS). At that point the Amiga was put in my room and it saw great use during the rest of the 90's.

So many memories... I won't write them all here at the moment. Let's just say nothing touched my childhood more than the Amiga. I feel I was given a unique perspective on the Amiga, given how into it my father was. He was a hobbyist. Unlike the C64, where much of his stuff was "borrowed" he was now in his 30's and had some disposable income. Much of our Amiga library was the real deal. Not only games, but fine utilities like word processors and paint programs. I feel he was the primary market for computers back then. At least in America. Overseas it was a very different beast. But I feel much of the love my father and the real users in America had for these quite intricate and big games has been forgotten, as the people his age are not your typical YouTuber. Not only those big games but the facts about the Amiga in this country have been grossly misrepresented by the younger budget title buying Europeans. I love them for their love of the computer, but they don't know crap about the Amiga in this country. The misinformation is furthered by younger DOS users who were into shareware games - Because their parents had no clue how to use a computer - They never saw an Amiga, thus it must not have existed... There were 3 Amiga stores very close to me... It most certainly existed.

My dad died young. He was 45 when that occurred in 2001. I think a lot of people think my retro leanings have a lot to do with his dying. I wouldn't agree. When we got our Windows 95 PC I was longing for certain games on the Amiga... I made my dad hook up our NES to another TV when we got a Genesis. I would get my dad to buy old Amiga games for DOS (like Pirates, Gold Box Games Etc) only to play them and see they were not the same thing... They almost always disappointed me when thinking of the Amiga... In 1999 my dad bought another PC, giving me the 1997 model. I started using DOSUAE, Fellow, WinUAE, Nesticle... Started playing these games how I remembered... I was in love again. I would talk to my dad about beating Death Knights of Kyrnn (a game I remembered him playing and me failing at) - He responded with "oh yeah? That one was easy... Try Pools of Radiance ;) - haha. I always had the love of this older stuff.

Anyway, I have a small channel on YouTube, and my main goal there is to give unscripted memories and reviews of these games (as well as many other retro things) from back in the day. Trust me, if I can remember breaking a C64 at two years of age, I've got a lot of crap to cover... Not only those memories, but I do my best to speak of these games and whatever as an adult would have back then. As I imagine my dad, a computer nerd hobbyist, would have spoken of them back then. As magazines I remember reading from America spoke of them. I'm telling you it's much different than what you currently hear from both a European dominated Amiga voice on YouTube, as well as child (at the time) dominated PC/NES/Genesis American voice on YouTube. There just is not that older voice here on the web. I feel it's a sad thing because, at least in America, the adult (25-45) group was the most important part of computer sales. These were not people who bought a DOS machine so they could get Lotus and do their work stuff at home. Those people bought very expensive PCs and Lotus, never another thing. It was not parents who bought their children a PC so they could "learn" instead of just playing video games. I feel this is the dominate voice on the web these days, and I'm telling you magazines and adults did not give two shits about Commander Keen or Duke Nukum. They played Civilization, Railroad Tycoon, Might and Magic, Gateway to the Savage Frontier, F-18, Pirates, Ports of Call, Defender of the Crown, The Secret Of Monkey Island - To name but a few. Some of those, based on their overwhelming history, do get some respect, but quite a few are almost forgotten about, like Lost Dutchman Mine. It is my goal to present these games from the eyes of an adult nerd from back then, a position I do my best to be true to, given my unique position of being from the seed of a nerd (not too many of us).

So yeah, I'm Shot97, I think the official YouTube name is MrShot97 if you want to look me up. But now that I'm here, I think I like it. Written word has always been a love of mine and I was thinking of once in awhile maybe doing a write up of some of these games I feature on YouTube. I'll try one soonish, and I'll see if anyone is interested. Again, thanks for inviting me over, looking forward to digging into some of the topics and contributing.

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intric8
Seattle, WA, USA
Website

Posted Sat Mar 19, 2016 9:03 am

Hey Shot97, your intro hits me pretty hard.

I happen to be turning 45 this August. Your dad dying at such a young age must be been incredibly tough, especially as you two seemed quite close and had a lot in common.

My first computer was a C64. I got really heavy into it when I was in junior high-school. I didn't know how to code, and didn't have a phone in my room for a modem, but my best friend did. Every night he pulled down games off pirate boards - some before they were even up for sale (I remember being handed Top Gun before it hit store shelves). Anyway, he was my conduit. This would have been 86-88 or thereabouts. My absolute favorite title back then was Legend of the Ancients, a very well polished dungeon crawler with Ultima-style world maps. Like an idiot, I traded my C64 to a friend who had an Apple II+ (with a green monochrome monitor) and a few titles. It was the dumbest thing I had ever done in my life, but I think I somehow hoped against all hope that it might scratch the surface of what the Apple IIe could do. It didn't. My software connection had already moved on by then and I was left with a hunk of crap. The joysticks were a total joke, Ultima was lame (IMO) and Castle Wolfenstein was unbearably hard. I remember the first time I heard a soldier announce "Achtung!" and it was so garbled I thought the computer sneezed. What a joke.

Fast-forward a few years and I also moved to the PC as it was 1) affordable, even if unbearably unreliable, and 2) I received a lot of hand-me-down parts from friends. So for several years I simply built frankenstein PCs - back when 80 MB of RAM would cost you hundreds of dollars. Playing Starcraft over a modem with a friend, though, was pretty damned cool.

In 1998 - 1999 with the help of this bizarre little red barn in Texas that only sold Commodore hardware and software (no joke) I rebuilt my C64 collection back up for the 2nd time. A lot of their titles were still shrink-wrapped. It was astounding. Then, in 2000 I moved to the Bay Area and had to unload most of my worldly possessions again.

I'm a designer and by then had moved to OS9 Macs. I used b/w Macs in high-school and always missed that scene (also prohibitively expensive at the time). I still have my ruby iMac that I bought in 1998 in a box. I never had the heart to upgrade it to OS X. About once a year I pull it out and tinker with it. It's still a gorgeous machine. I even hooked a Wi-Fi card into it and surf around (painfully).

A few years ago after moving to Seattle I decided to rebuild my C64 collection again. I still collect stuff for it to this day (this week I received Deathlord from EA, which I think uses the same game engine as Wasteland, although it's supposed to he ridiculously hard). I love the old large/flat "boxes" that can be displayed like mini-album covers. I built the new machine out of 2 64's I got off Ebay and this sucker is freaking museum quality. Perfect case (from a dead machine) and perfect guts/new keys (from a case that looked like it has been peed on my a very large ogre). I have 3 drives for it including a 3 1/2 drive, which is mostly for storage, then upgraded to an Ultimate II cart. That pretty much ended any hardware needs I ever had. I run original and clean Commodore monitors for it and my A1200 (one each). I also hook my SNES into the Commodore monitor that my C64 uses - the colors and look/feel are simply unbeatable and, frankly, the way its supposed to be viewed. These are what these machines were made for, after all. Maybe some day I'll create a sister site for C64s, too.

But I always wanted an Amiga and now that I have one, I'm having a great time. My older brother had a friend who simply loved his (esp D&D based games), but I just never had the cash back then to buy one. I had to save for a year just to buy a printer for my C64... and the one I eventually bought didn't work! :( It was a knock-off and the parallel cable simply didn't work. An original Commodore printer was insanely expensive back then. My parents divorced when I was starting 4th grade, and we just never had any money.

Anyway these days its all about the Amiga for me as I race to catch up. I just bought Theme Park, which I should be checking out in a couple of days. I'm headlong into Populous (currently stuck on a level). I've gone down several levels in Eye of the Beholder and The Black Crypt (all of these are so hard, they're borderline sadistic). By the way, I think Populous is meant to be booted into PAL mode. When I boot it into NTSC, and stretch to fit the monitor, the faces are elongated. It runs in either mode, but looks vertically stretched in NTSC mode. So there's one. (ha!)

I'm in the final stages of building a tool to create a Games archive here - just a few days away. I want to put a few hundred titles on the site to attract more users beyond what the forum can provide. Filling it up will take forever, maybe even a couple of years, but that should be fun, too. I'll use the titles you mentioned above as a nice place to start. :)

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intric8
Seattle, WA, USA
Website

Posted Sat Mar 19, 2016 9:37 am

Forgot to mention this - for what it's worth, I've got 2 kids. Girl (9 this month) and Boy (7 in June). Boy sounds a lot like you. He loves to sit next to me in front of the old machines (new to him!) and watch me play. He can't resist trying to raise/lower land in Populous. His favorite (which usually induces tears) though is on the SNES - a star wars game. Brutally hard, but fabulous platfomer. I always have to help him with a few levels or all hell breaks loose.

I guess I don't mind. :) Sometimes I'll be on the Amiga, while he's on the SNES. I'll take a pic of my very messy "shrine" and post it here for ya.

Cheers!

P.S.
I'm the designer at a trivia company named Sporcle. I mention this because I think you're from Detroit (still?) and my company acquired a trivia company based in Detroit about 2 years ago. I work on the website and mobile apps. But the crew in Detroit focuses on live trivia shows - you know, like in bars/pubs with a host with a microphone, etc. and people hanging out scribbling down answers. It's called Sporcle Live. If you're walking around town and you see a poster for Sporcle Live, that's my company. :) Detroit is where we have something crazy like 150 shows around town.

Peace

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intric8
Seattle, WA, USA
Website

Posted Sat Mar 19, 2016 10:28 am

A couple of pics of my (very messy) setup these days.

A1200 on the left, C64 on the right, SNES to the far-right (great thing about those monitors is you can plug one machine in the front and another in the back - so wire swapping b.s., just that little switch to tell it to use the Front or Back ports).

The C64 monitor is so bright, it gets kind of blown out in the shot(s), but Ioaded my boxed Pirates! (2nd ed.) from 1987 for you.

I've got the map, too, but that's a permanent part of your brain. ;)
Attachments
setup.png
My setup, with a few of my silly drawings on the wall. (Except for the far-right, that's an original from the master Bernie Wrightson, who I've read is dying of cancer these days.) In the very far right of the shot, blurry, is Deathlord on the shelf. But that's C64 related, so I won't post about it here. :P

pirates.png
Pirates!


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Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Mar 23, 2016 6:43 am

Very cool to see Pirates! on the old Commodore monitor. My dad had bought one for the C64 at some point (originally he used a black and white TV) and he used the same one when he got to the Amiga. Something happened to it though. He bought a different VGA Commodore monitor at some point. It only required a small adapter to be fitted to use. It was a beautiful monitor as well, although it did not have RCA hookups like the other one did. I remember this because at one point the Amiga died and he didn't seem like he wanted to have it fixed. It would only boot to the kickstart screen, disks wouldn't load. This was around the time I wanted the NES in my room since we just got the Genesis in my parents room. He talked about using the Commodore monitor for the NES in my room but then when he went to unhook it from the Amiga he saw it was only VGA. He remarked how the other one had normal hookups as well. Anyway, I ended up getting the same black and white TV he started on the C64 with as the TV I used in my room for the NES. hahha... My memories of some of those later NES games like Kirby's Adventure are in black and white! - and of course, he decided to fix the Amiga thank God. - Probably another one that was my fault. I kind of remember getting home eagerly to play Into the Eagles Nest (I'd been obsessed with it for weeks) and I kind of slammed the disk into the drive really hard and maybe ejected it while it was loading.

If your kid is like me, teach him to be nice to that lady! I always felt so bad after screwing up like that though. To this day I feel pain because of that, and thus, treat things and people rather nicely. I always wanted to play the games my dad was playing, but there was this strong love/respect for him, I wouldn't be whinny about such things. When I heard him come home from work and start to go down the basement stairs, I "wanted" to save my stuff and hand it over to him. It worked just like that until 1999 when he gave me the 1997 PC and then I started spending less and less time in the basement with him. Aww, kind of sad thinking about that. Oh well, it let me experiment in a way I would not have wanted to on his computer. I started messing with DOS and all kinds of crap when I got my own PC.

I made this miscellaneous video for my dad awhile ago: https://youtu.be/XHO6pzVbqCQ?list=PL_W3 ... yCO3uK2XRt

I agree with you on Ultima. I own them all. My dad loved Ultima and when the last one came out in 1999, Ultima 9, he bought it and it came with all the old ones. I tried them then, I tried them on the Amiga many times later... I just can't get into them. I love RPGs but I can't do it. I also love Wasteland which had a similar graphical style to Ultima but I can't stand those Ultima games. In fact, the only one I like, is 9... and everyone hates that one! It was a buggy mess when it came out (so bad they shipped us new cds with the update) but I always dug it.

I feel so lucky to have grown up with an Amiga and having a father who was into computers. I love that I also had an NES and Genesis... I can love all sorts of games. The Amiga was something else though, I could tell just being around my dad when he went to shops that sold them. They all knew each other, he would hang out there for quite some time just bullshitting. He had some choice words for Commodore like many others at the time... Funny thing, a girl requested I review Wheel of Fortune on the Amiga, I had never played it but I looked it up and it used the Amiga's built in speech so I was on board. Upon looking at the readme file, turns out that game was made by someone who worked at our main Amiga store. The store was called Slipped Disk. That store was in business for a long time, nobody from Europe is ever going to convince me the Amiga didn't make some people money in America. They think it should have been sold at Toys R Us... No clue who bought computers over here.

Yes, Populous I imagine was designed on a PAL Amiga using NTSC resolution. A game like that, it was designed that way because they wanted to port it from day one. A good example is Formula One Grand Prix. I'm finishing that review up now. Released late 1991 in Europe on the Amiga, in 320x200.... But certain things like speed being in MPH instead of KPH show American's were on their mind. And the biggest reason for that game... They changed the name. An Amiga only game at the time... It went to DOS in like 1994, years later. Released in America on the Amiga in early 1992 as World Circuit. Those couple months? That was so they could fix the manual and replace every instance of the original name with World Circuit. Every single page had to be done. 168 pages plus reference cards and of course a box. The intro sequence was tweaked as well. You simply do not spend that time/money if you don't truly believe America was important. So yes, in these rare European 320x200 games, they are designed to be in widescreen. I hate that they did that... I really wish if they had American's on their mind that they would have used an NTSC machine to design the thing on. Because the thing about it is that every 320x200 Amiga game would have ONLY looked correct on a PAL Amiga. Some of these games (like Lemmings) made the jump to every system imaginable... And those systems saw it like an NTSC user would have seen it, in 4:3 full screen. Lemmings it really does not matter, those pixels are sooooo small... Still, a game that was ported to all kinds of systems and it's only correct on a PAL Amiga. It happens. I had the argument with someone commenting on my video about all of that and I had to tell him I've said plenty of times that there are PAL games like that. But the problem with American NTSC games is so bad I have to be a little extreme when I'm talking about it just to get peoples attention. All "American/Canadian/Japanese" 320x200 games are shown incorrectly. I said all 320x200 games in the video to hit it home that there's a problem. It deserves an asterisk for sure, but if you complicate it too much people are going to say it's too much of a hassle.

At the very least, all "true PAL" 320x256 games are shown as those who played them originally saw. The emulators default to PAL mode and they show those 320x256 games in 4:3 as intended. However many 320x200 games that were designed in PAL mode are currently being shown correctly. While almost all 320x200 NTSC American games are being shown incorrectly. That's a problem I truly want fixed... It wouldn't kill me if a couple games designed in Europe in 320x200 were shown incorrectly if it meant all American games were shown right. - And of course, all true PAL 320x256 games would continue to be shown correctly, as they are now, because those games simply will not run in NTSC mode. On a game by game basis I will always mention which mode I feel is the right mode as the artists intended, but as a topic that I truly hope spreads around the internet... I'd rather a few European games get the same treatment American games have been getting if that meant the games from here finally got to be seen correctly. It's not like there's not plenty of videos already showing the European ones correctly. I try to play them correctly, because I don't like stretch images, but I know if I had this very good conversation I'm having with you on this game vs that game nobody would listen to me, and nobody would change. I have gotten a couple people to say they're going to think twice when putting up a video... I'll believe it when I see it. Quite awhile ago I had gotten one guy to show Amiga games close to 4:3 (his editing software was kind of weird and it was slightly wider than 4:3) but he's a whole other story and he deleted his channel... I want to get people shocked, want to hammer it in that a huge crime is being committed against the artists of these games, and I really want them to change. Jim Sachs will probably never see my video, even if I do Defender of the Crown (which I am!) but there are a whole lot of other people that could get peoples attention.

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Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Mar 23, 2016 6:44 am

The stuff I had to do just to get Part 2 to have some views... Jeeze... Two days go by and it only had like 25 views... 92 subscribers, 25 views... Part 1 has almost 150 views. At that point I started going all over and begging people to give a shit about this video. To share/To look/Anything... I hate doing that and I'm done for a very long time! But I wrote some tearjerking words in order to get a few people to take a look at Part2. At this point I've done all I can do for that. I just hope some people will continue to see it. I even wrote that if any big/medium YouTuber is lurking, steal it... Word for word if you want. I just want this stuff known. There were a lot of good American games made, and all of them are being shown in a way that artist did not intend. I'd be interested in how Europeans saw it (I'm very interested in how they saw Genesis games, the same issues but everything defaults to NTSC so you don't often see what they saw) but I can't sit by and let the Europeans show American games how they saw them, when they didn't see them right, and they most likely didn't even pay for them. A game like Populous might have been designed by a European, but that game would have been a hard sell to Europeans given what it would have cost brand new. It may have gained notice, but did they buy it? I want to hug them as brothers who share a mutual love for a machine... But I've been on YouTube for a very long time, and the stuff they say about America is mean, it is ignorant, it is wrong.

They don't even know there's an NTSC button in the emulator. Further, they don't know what it even means. A lot of Europeans truly believe the Amiga was born in Europe. Those that do know it's an American machine think it was a failure by 1988 and everything went over to Europe. Yeah, they should have seen some interviews with big companies did with American Amiga magazines. As early as 1987 and spoken many times after American software companies making Amiga games would say "We don't know if want to be selling anything in Europe... It costs a lot of money and all they do is steal the games..." - Sierra, a company known for making shit ports to the Amiga... Still talked quite the game about it. They loved the Amiga truth be told. They just didn't want to design on it obviously. But they loved doing their half assed ports and sending them over to the Amiga and I've found them saying several times that the Amiga is one of their most important markets. This was not because of European Amiga users, this was because of American Amiga users. I saw figures once from Sierra that should have made the case for them to create that stuff on the Amiga and not DOS.

It's just so obvious to me that there's a lot more to the Amiga story than what is being told. Commodore went under, they have plenty of blame for that, American computer users should not be a part of that blame. Sites like Hall of Light which have those detailed yes/no things on if the game can be installed, if it's an Amiga original, etc.? No mention of NTSC/PAL origins. The magazine reviews they list? All European magazines... American magazines have been scanned, I've got Amiga World (the one we read the most) first to last issue. There are reviews for these games in America and HOL does not have any of them. The way the floppy looked was often very different in America. If you see a picture of a European floppy it's almost always the naked disk with the title of the game printed directly onto the disk. In America they usually had a fancy sticker on top of the disk and none of these are shown on HOL. Europeans are so proud of the Amiga and I'd love them sooo much more if they could stop acting like they "got it" and we didn't. It's good that the Amiga was popular enough to get games made in real PAL mode. That's awesome because Europeans got crapped on with all sorts of gaming systems for the longest before and after the Amiga. They got catered to finally with the Amiga... But they don't understand what their market was made of, and that there even existed an American market that was buying quite a bit for quite a lot of money, that many of the games they came to love through perhaps not honorable ways, would not have existed without American's.

They mattered, we mattered... The Amiga mattered. :)

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Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Mar 23, 2016 6:47 am

Oh, and your company, Sporcle. I do kind of remember seeing that. The Detroiter Bar in Greektown comes to mind. Don't think I ever paid too much attention but I'll have to take a look when I see it next. It makes sense that it's doing well here. This city loves its sports.

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intric8
Seattle, WA, USA
Website

Posted Wed Mar 23, 2016 9:50 am

As for views:
Take this with a grain of salt, as I am not an active content creator on YouTube. I have posted one video, and it has over 131K views. Granted I posted it in 2006...

Key reasons for mass viewings (IMO):
  • The topic - it is niche, but popular niche. So I had an unfair advantage there at the get-go. I took a cult-hit movie scene from Evil Dead 2 and "re-shot it" the way I thought it should be shot. And I did the entire thing in 3D with lots of matte paintings. Took 6 solid months of my life, working on it constantly to produce. (YouTube's compression is HORRIBLE and darkened the thing to where so many of my details are washed out. Anyway...).
  • It's really short. It is only 1 minute long. People these days have really short attention spans, I think, unless it is a very specific "How To" with step-by-step instructions they are trying to follow.
  • Your content could probably be broken down into smaller chunks. That way a user could (for example) Watch your intro with editorial-opinions in Part 1 (10 mins). Next could be side-by-side examples of game and apps in Part 2 (10 -20 mins). And depending on how that goes, your conclusion / wrap could be part 3 (10 mins).
  • You might want to check your analytics tab to see if you can glean any real info. If only you could see the PageViews to your video, and compare that to the actual Views. Does the time scare people off? I have no idea. Their analytics are pretty lame IMO. Too high-level to be very informative on how to tailor your content.

    Check this out - my 1 minute video average view is only 31 seconds! They don't even get to the final gag! But how "views" are calculated, I'm not sure. I will say this, though: I wouldn't chop my video to 30 seconds...
Europe:
I get your frustration - I do. But I also SO much appreciate their unapologetic fandom from a purely selfish level. If it wasn't for some in the UK/Germany/other places, I'd be almost completely SOL. All the hardware comes from there these days (new hardware) and a lot of software restoration and catering, too. They've kept it alive, even if the historical document is flawed. This is part of the reason I started this site. One was to carefully document my own experiences. But secondly, I want to create a voice for everyone - and that includes us in North America. Almost every place you go online is from a UK or Scandinavian (or German, Italian, Spanish, etc.) point of view. There are so few U.S./Canadian voices. I hope to increase the volume a little, but not alienate our European and Australian brothers and sisters. To your larger point, we're all here because of a shared interest.

Sporcle Live:
From what I've heard, Bobcat Bonnie's or McShane's downtown are the absolute best shows to go to. I'll admit that I don't actually go to shows (truth!), but I have played the games in the office and they are fun in small groups.

EDIT:
I did a search and found "YouTube: [...] counts a view after a user has watched a video for “around” 30 seconds." That definition sounds completely ludicrous, and I can't believe that would be the case. 30 seconds is all it takes? That can't be right. It should be proportional to the entire length.

If it is true, then, I think you would have to focus more intently on the SEO of your video's title to gain more traction.
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YouTube Analytics for Evil Dead 3 1/3


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Shot97
Detroit, MI, USA
Website

Posted Wed Mar 23, 2016 3:25 pm

Remember I post 3 minute long Super 8 films as well. In terms of something retro that is clear and concise and gets to the point, there's nothing better. Nobody watches those. They care about what they care about, I do not believe time factors into someones decision to click on a video. In terms of those with short attention spans, you will never see another YouTuber with better descriptions. I should probably mention those more often, but it would shock me personally if there's anyone who hasn't at least once clicked "see more" and seen how much time is spent on what I do there. I feel anybody can quickly find something they would enjoy in any of my videos if they simply read those short blurbs on the topics discussed in any section. The videos are ultimately done for myself and if I notice via analytics someone did not care about a certain topic I make a mental note to talk about it again just to piss them off. The "only" thing I promise anyone watching my videos, a promise very few others can give which says quite a lot in my eyes, is that I only post videos I myself would want to watch now and again. I have like 72 videos in the last year, and there's not a single one that is unworthy of another viewing it in my eyes. People might like me, might not, most likely have never seen me, but I don't really care what they think. That's the wonderful thing about being in an era of YouTube that will not let the smaller people grow. 6 years ago much could happen. My most viewed videos have around 700, a couple anyway, there's no difference analytically between those videos and anything else. Part 1 was treated very nicely, I just wish more had watched part 2, which shows them how to fix the real problem on the internet, WinUAE. Perhaps I should have switched the two parts around. But in terms of what was said, there are people who watched them both 100% through, and I already cut out 40 minutes at least from them, it was all important stuff in my eyes. I only cared because I believe the topic is important enough to transcend anyones feelings about me. That in the hands of an LGR that topic would have blown up, and he's welcome to steal it. Although he only cares about European PAL games if I remember correctly... hahaha.

I'm not going to worry about it, I did my whoring of part two and it now has respectable numbers for me. I did what I thought was in the publics interest, to highlight a great problem that wouldn't be hard for them to fix, and it's out there. Now, at the very least, if anyone looks at an NTSC game in PAL mode and thinks things look "weird" they can go into YouTube and search and perhaps they will find my topic and learn. Much like installing a hard drive or transferring things from PC to Amiga. When it comes to those You're Not Stupid Guides, which have always been long, they seem to like those more than anything else. So if the fault is in me, I'm afraid I'll be small forever, cause I've never cared about what will get me views, and if I ever made a video that went viral, rather than do similar videos and exploit what made that one popular, I'd make a short video telling anyone that subbed because of the popular one they'd probably want to hit unsub because I'll never talk about it again. Whatever issues I have as someone that makes videos shall always be there. Those PAL/NTSC ones got me 6 subs, more than any one video. I simply never blame myself when it comes to views/likes/whatever. I either blame YouTube for not showing it to them in their feed (I know that happens) or people that probably should have never subscribed to me in the first place. I'm quite the bastard like that. hahha





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