Discuss your latest vintage Amiga finds!
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BloodyCactus
Lexington VA

by BloodyCactus posted Fri Sep 07, 2018 6:04 am

mattsoft wrote:Yeah, you will need to scrape that solder mask and neutralize the battery leakage. Don't be discouraged though. I have a 3000 with extensive visual damage from a leaked battery and yet it works nearly 100% -- only the scan doubler shows some signs of funkiness and I'm working to track that down and get it repaired.


once below the solder mask, it will get between the layers. at that point its living on borrowed time before failure :(
--/\-[ Bloody Cactus :: http://kråketær.com :: http://mega-tokyo.com ]-/\--
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Dynamic_Computing

by Dynamic_Computing posted Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:27 pm

Success! I cleaned the daylights out of the horrible looking motherboard, swapped my chips from my non-working A2000 board, and poof! I get a boot screen! I harbor no illusions that this is perfect and will continue to work forever, but I am so happy with my progress! No I will put this back in my A2000 case and make sure all the hardware works and my OS is still intact on my drives.
I figure I put in about two or three hours of determined cleaning on this thing. I went as far as to take a tiny little tool and scrape clean each contact on the 68000 socket. But, $80 for the A2000, $35 in shipping and about $10 in cleaning supplies and I have a fully functioning A2000 again! Time to put some of my Zorro II cards to work again!
My goal is to put in my GVP '40 card with 32 MB RAM, My Picasso II RTG Card, My A386 Bridgeboard, and possibly put the Video Toaster back.
Attachments
A2000_6.jpg
A2000_5.jpg
https://www.youtube.com/c/10minuteamigaretrocast
@10marc1 on Twitter
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intric8
Seattle, WA, USA

by intric8 posted Sun Sep 09, 2018 3:46 pm

Very nice - congrats, man!
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EzdineG
Springfield, MO

by EzdineG posted Sun Sep 09, 2018 10:10 pm

Great work!
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Dynamic_Computing

by Dynamic_Computing posted Mon Sep 10, 2018 9:06 am

It is not reliable enough to use in the current state - but at least I know what this issue is now. I have a new socket for the 68000 and the ROM shipping to me, and I have a trace or two to fix before it is ready for Prime Time. I think I will do the socket swap as one of my videos for 10 Minute Amiga Retro Cast - that might be fun!
https://www.youtube.com/c/10minuteamigaretrocast
@10marc1 on Twitter
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Zippy Zapp
CA, USA

by Zippy Zapp posted Mon Sep 10, 2018 12:59 pm

Nice job!
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Bulletdust

by Bulletdust posted Tue Sep 11, 2018 4:06 am

Just a tip. When dealing with acid damaged traces, hold the board over a light. When the light shines through the board it makes it far easier to locate damaged traces.
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Dynamic_Computing

by Dynamic_Computing posted Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:13 am

Oh my! That 68000 chip socket is a stubborn little guy! I am no master solder-dude (That is an official title), but I do know my way around one. I have used my new heat gun (Which excels at removing Surface mount components, but not so good at thru-the-hole components). I gave up on that pretty quick, as the socket is to big to melt all at once. I used my nice iron and solder wick, but that too is being stubborn... So I order a solder sucker off Amazon and it should be here in a few days. We will see how that goes.

I tested the traces on the ROM chip and they seem intact, so for now I will just replace the 68000 socket. We will see how that goes. I now have two A2000 board that need solder work and two A3640 boards that need it, not to mention my A4000 and A1200 are using original parts! I had better get good at this quick!
https://www.youtube.com/c/10minuteamigaretrocast
@10marc1 on Twitter
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Bulletdust

by Bulletdust posted Mon Sep 17, 2018 9:41 pm

Make sure you're touching up all solder joints with a liberal amount of fresh leaded solder first or you'll never get that socket out, even with a desoldering tool.
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Zippy Zapp
CA, USA

by Zippy Zapp posted Tue Sep 18, 2018 7:35 am

Yeah, as you found out a heat gun will not help you here and could do more damage then good. The vacuum type de-solder iron is the way to go.

If a pin is really stubborn, then as pointed out above, a fresh bit of solder will help immensely. Especially important with corroded pins and the ground pins. You can also cut the socket around that pin, and remove it by itself. I had to do this for a couple of pins and it made it easier to remove it in sections. YMMV though.

One tip though. When you get your de-soldering tool, try it on an old board first. Mine is really strong heat-wise and if I set it to the same temp that I set my soldering iron to (350c) it is way too hot and will burn the solder mask or pads. I had to experiment to find the right temp, and for me it is about 295c for most things and 320c for ground plane components.

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